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Unread 04-11-2007, 02:58 AM   #1
K6UK
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Default New Ham Radios: Coming Soon!

Icom, Kenwood and Yaesu all have new radios in the pipeline.
Here's what I have so far:

Yaesu:
First on the list is the new Yaesu FTM-10R - which has bluetooth (yes you can use a headset) and a mic on the front panel.


- Wideband receiver
- Broadcasting support (including MF!)
- Bluetooth ready
- Dual receive (no more details about available)
- Split tone
- Detachable front panel

Next from Yaesu is a new HF Rig - the FT-450

It looks like this would make a nice camp radio. This might be my first HF rig.

ICOM:
Icom's new dual bander:

This is a much needed upgrade, since the 2720 really was a stinker.
It has some nice features, such as diversity recieve and is DSTAR digital upgradeable. It's a nice looking unit, but I suspect it will be pricey.

KENWOOD:
Just released is news of new Kenwoods, but no real details yet. Just some sneak peek photos. But you can expect some nice APRS features on the new TM-D701A

Here's the TM-D701A


and here is the TM-V71A


BTW www.rigpix.com is a nice source for new radio information.
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Unread 04-11-2007, 10:06 AM   #2
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Looks really nice.

SO far the only feature I'm know about is the drtachable faceplate, so the radio can be mounted in a well vented area and out of the way.

I think I sort of get dual band recieve and repeater functionality. However what other functions would be really handy for us on trips or good to consider? ALso I guess all of them are high power 50W or more?
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Unread 04-11-2007, 05:15 PM   #3
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I think anything 25W+ is gonna be good for the types of trips we do. Most mobiles do 50W which should be plenty.

Dual band receive is just so you can monitor two channels independently. Not something I think I will need but you never know.

Cross band repeat is kinda strange. If I understand it right, you can use a weaker radio (handheld) to connect to your mobile rig, which will then broadcast/repeat your transmission. Maybe someone else has a better way of describing it.


Anyways, taking the test on saturday. Robert you gonna make it???
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Unread 04-11-2007, 06:05 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vegaskurt View Post

Cross band repeat is kinda strange. If I understand it right, you can use a weaker radio (handheld) to connect to your mobile rig, which will then broadcast/repeat your transmission. Maybe someone else has a better way of describing it.
Cross band repeaters work by transmitting and reciving over two diffrent frequencies.

Mobile sends a voice transmission to a cross band repeater in one frequency then transmits it to another mobile on a different frequency. ie 2m to 70cm.

I think in your example you are describing a basic repeater that boosts the signal.

In the case where you use your handheld and transmit to your mobile then boosting the signal to relay the transmission onwards, I think that is called a relay control.

Also a dual band just means you have two bands. You may not necessarily monitor two bands at the same time. I think this is on the more expensive units. I'll check on this and post up if different.
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Unread 04-11-2007, 06:56 PM   #5
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dang Mark, you're an expert now!

Hanna mentioned his Fire Dept uses kenwood and they are nice.
I have the 7800 and the only thing I don't like is the mic plugs into the faceplate. I will get a extension wire and have a plug at teh center console or something... but Icom's have the mic at the box, which I think, is better.

Between the Icom 208 and 7800, I felt like the 7800 was a more solid unit.
The nice thing about the Icom was the face is smaller, and you can change backlight color. The knobs and stuff felt really cheap tho.

FTM10R- does the mic built into the face mean you don't need a handheld mic anymore? If so, that's really cool.
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Unread 04-11-2007, 08:28 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bulldog View Post
However what other functions would be really handy for us on trips or good to consider?
From what I understand a dual band 45-50W ham will suffice for most trail adventures.

From there I think it would be worth having a TNC (Terminal Node Controller) already built in to your unit. You can then plug this into either your laptop or a PDA for text messaging and auto position reporting. You can be tracked by other station users so they know you location at any time. I could see this as being really beneficial for solo or deep back country travel.

While it sounds a little extreme, I do notice a number of people on trails now wheeling with a laptop being used for their navigation. Plugging in your Ham is not much of a stretch of the imagination. Not something you would need for Big Bear or Death Valley tho. If you wanted this function I think you'd also need an APRS (auto position reporting system) terminal node controller that is often built into many ham radios already.

Actually come to think of it, I think you can plug into any GPS in your car and you can send APRS.
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Last edited by expat; 04-11-2007 at 08:32 PM.
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Unread 04-12-2007, 12:21 AM   #7
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This is a very interesting discussion, should defnitely keep it going.

I can see how having the repeater function would be useful if you have 2 groups going in the same area and also as a reopeater from ahandheld.

Teh position reporting will be a very good funtion for us. THink of all the trips were somebody has to come in at night to the campsite, due to a late start. WIth Ham they can pick up the signal miles and miles away and tteack down tha campsite.

If we keep goign on this track we will become a search and rescue team soon.

ANythign else to keep in mind in terms of features or actually a recommended radio for us plebs??
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Unread 04-12-2007, 05:22 PM   #8
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One minor thing to consider is that you will need a speaker. Unlike CB's there is no speaker in the handset. I wish there was but hams dont do that apparently. So you will need to figure out where to mount a speaker if you go with a detachable face unit.

I think I will get this one:
http://universal-radio.com/catalog/speakers/3472.html

A yotatech member was able to mount it in a pretty good spot.
3rd gen pic below,
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Unread 04-12-2007, 06:22 PM   #9
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that's a slick speaker install

I got one at radio shack (around $12 also) looks identical to the one you linked and just put it under the dash. It is really loud and clear.
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Unread 04-14-2007, 08:51 AM   #10
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Another nice feature (found mostly on higher end units with SSB) is RIT. The Reciever Incremental Tuning control allows you to tune the reciever slightly up and down (about 1 kHz) without changing your transmit frequency.

I think this is mostly useful for long range transmission and reception (using repeaters) over long periods of time (say a half day) where the Dopler effect comes into play.

I remember having the RIT button on a unit I had in Oz in my teen years but never really used it because my "playing around" was mostly local (picking up chicks ) "CQ, CQ, CQ DX...any YL's copy comeback?"
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